Blackwood Basin Group
Blackwood Basin Group
Blackwood Basin Group
Blackwood Basin Group

About the UWO

Board the Jetty Train, and visit the Underwater Observatory. This unique building allows visitors to experience one of Australia’s greatest artificial reefs.

Descend 8 metres to the ocean floor via a spiral staircase to discover an awe inspiring forest of vividly coloured tropical and sub-tropical corals, sponges, fish and invertebrates. Eleven viewing windows at various levels within the Observatory allow visitors to look out on some of the 300 different marine species that live beneath the jetty. Provision of a lift within the Observatory ensures that this amazing experience is available to those with limited mobility.

Background

The culmination of 10 years of planning and fundraising resulted in the opening of the Busselton Jetty Underwater Observatory on 13 December 2003.

Located 1.7 kilometres from shore at the end of the Jetty, the Underwater Observatory has been designed to accommodate up to 40 people at one time. Descending 8 metres beneath the waters’ surface, visitors can view the amazing corals and fish life through eleven viewing windows, at various levels within a 9.5 metre diameter observation chamber.

Described as Australia’s greatest artificial reef, the Busselton Jetty, with more than 300 individual marine species, is host to an awe inspiring “forest” of vividly-coloured tropical and sub-tropical corals, sponges, fish and invertebrates. Each year during autumn and winter, the Leeuwin Current brings a narrow band of warm water down the Western Australian coastline.

This warm southerly current is responsible for introducing an incredibly diverse array of tropical and sub-tropical species into Geographe Bay, resulting in coral growth at a latitude of 33 degrees south. This is a remarkable phenomenon when compared to the western coastlines of other southern hemisphere continents such as Africa and South America which have no coral growth below 5 degrees south.